Then and Now: Historical Photographs of Cambodia

Then and Now: Historical Photographs of Cambodia is a project linking the history of Cambodia from the past to the present through photographs and descriptions. It is a collaborative project between Arizona State University Libraries and Northern Illinois University Libraries aimed at digitizing old photographs taken by Mimi Palgen Maisonneuve in the 1950s and 1960s and photographing the same locations to show contemporary Cambodian life in the year 2007.

The Palgen Photo Collection from the 1950s and 1960s offers a unique look at life in Cambodia from royal ceremonies to the rural life of commoners. This time period is significant because the images record life in Cambodia just prior to the beginning of hostilities that would lead to the Khmer Rouge period and the devastation of the entire Cambodian society. The contemporary photograph collection, taken in June and July 2007, contains pictures of village and rural scenes, everyday images of the urban lives of people in Phnom Penh, Kandal and Kampong Speu provinces, and historical monuments in Siem Reap province. The connection between these old and new photographs illustrates changes in village and urban life in Cambodia over these past few decades. Cambodia scholar and NIU Anthropologist, Judy Ledgerwood, along with Political Scientist, Kheang Un, coordinate this project for NIU with a graduate student in Anthropology at NIU, Pisith Phlong, as a research assistant. ASU Libraries' Southeast Asia Bibliographer Christopher Miller coordinates work from ASU with Pamela Nguyen Corey as a research assistant.

Angkor Thom, South Gate and Causeway
Angkor Thom, means big city, was the planned capital of Jayavarman VII, at the center of which was the state temple of Bayon. The walls of the city are 1.86 miles (3 kilometers) on each side, and enclose an area of 2225 acres (900 hectares), bordered by a 328 feet (100 meters) wide moat. The city has five main gates, and ach of them has a causeways crossing the moats lined with 54 gods (devas) on one side and 54 demons (asuras) on the other side bearing naga’s body, symbolizing the myth of the Churning of the Sea of Milk. The five gates of Angkor Thom are 1. South gate, locally known as Tonle Om gate, 2. East gate (or ghost gate), 3. North gate (or Dei Chhnang gate), 4. West gate (or Takao gate), 5. Victory gate., Location : Siem Reap., Source : Rooney, Dawn. Angkor: An Introduction. Hong Kong: Odyssey Guides, 2005., This item digitized and made available online with funds provided by United States Department of Education, TICFIA (Technological Innovation and Cooperation for Foreign Information) Grant P337A05006.
Angkor Thom, South Gate and Causeway
Angkor Thom, means big city, was the planned capital of Jayavarman VII, at the center of which was the state temple of Bayon. The walls of the city are 1.86 miles (3 kilometers) on each side, and enclose an area of 2225 acres (900 hectares), bordered by a 328 feet (100 meters) wide moat. The city has five main gates, and each of them has a causeways crossing the moats lined with 54 gods (devas) on one side and 54 demons (asuras) on the other side bearing naga’s body, symbolizing the myth of the Churning of the Sea of Milk. The five gates of Angkor Thom are 1. South gate, locally known as Tonle Om gate, 2. East gate (or ghost gate), 3. North gate (or Dei Chhnang gate), 4. West gate (or Takao gate), 5. Victory gate., Location : Siem Reap., Source : Rooney, Dawn. Angkor: An Introduction. Hong Kong: Odyssey Guides, 2005., This item digitized and made available online with funds provided by United States Department of Education, TICFIA (Technological Innovation and Cooperation for Foreign Information) Grant P337A05006.
Angkor Thom, South Gate
Angkor Thom, means big city, was the planned capital of Jayavarman VII, at the center of which was the state temple of Bayon. The walls of the city are 1.86 miles (3 kilometers) on each side, and enclose an area of 2225 acres (900 hectares), bordered by a 328 feet (100 meters) wide moat. The city has five main gates, and each of them has a causeways crossing the moats lined with 54 gods (devas) on one side and 54 demons (asuras) on the other side bearing naga’s body, symbolizing the myth of the Churning of the Sea of Milk. The five gates of Angkor Thom are 1. South gate, locally known as Tonle Om gate, 2. East gate (or ghost gate), 3. North gate (or Dei Chhnang gate), 4. West gate (or Takao gate), 5. Victory gate., Location : Siem Reap., Source : Rooney, Dawn. Angkor: An Introduction. Hong Kong: Odyssey Guides, 2005., This item digitized and made available online with funds provided by United States Department of Education, TICFIA (Technological Innovation and Cooperation for Foreign Information) Grant P337A05006.
Angkor Thom, South Gate
Angkor Thom, means big city, was the planned capital of Jayavarman VII, at the center of which was the state temple of Bayon. The walls of the city are 1.86 miles (3 kilometers) on each side, and enclose an area of 2225 acres (900 hectares), bordered by a 328 feet (100 meters) wide moat. The city has five main gates, and each of them has a causeways crossing the moats lined with 54 gods (devas) on one side and 54 demons (asuras) on the other side bearing naga’s body, symbolizing the myth of the Churning of the Sea of Milk. The five gates of Angkor Thom are 1. South gate, locally known as Tonle Om gate, 2. East gate (or ghost gate), 3. North gate (or Dei Chhnang gate), 4. West gate (or Takao gate), 5. Victory gate., Location : Siem Reap., Source : Rooney, Dawn. Angkor: An Introduction. Hong Kong: Odyssey Guides, 2005., This item digitized and made available online with funds provided by United States Department of Education, TICFIA (Technological Innovation and Cooperation for Foreign Information) Grant P337A05006.
Angkor Thom, South Gate
Angkor Thom, means big city, was the planned capital of Jayavarman VII, at the center of which was the state temple of Bayon. The walls of the city are 1.86 miles (3 kilometers) on each side, and enclose an area of 2225 acres (900 hectares), bordered by a 328 feet (100 meters) wide moat. The city has five main gates, and each of them has a causeways crossing the moats lined with 54 gods (devas) on one side and 54 demons (asuras) on the other side bearing naga’s body, symbolizing the myth of the Churning of the Sea of Milk. The five gates of Angkor Thom are 1. South gate, locally known as Tonle Om gate, 2. East gate (or ghost gate), 3. North gate (or Dei Chhnang gate), 4. West gate (or Takao gate), 5. Victory gate., Location : Siem Reap., Source : Rooney, Dawn. Angkor: An Introduction. Hong Kong: Odyssey Guides, 2005., This item digitized and made available online with funds provided by United States Department of Education, TICFIA (Technological Innovation and Cooperation for Foreign Information) Grant P337A05006.
Angkor Thom, Gate of Victory naga balustrade
Angkor Thom, means big city, was the planned capital of Jayavarman VII, at the center of which was the state temple of Bayon. The walls of the city are 1.86 miles (3 kilometers) on each side, and enclose an area of 2225 acres (900 hectares), bordered by a 328 feet (100 meters) wide moat. The city has five main gates, and each of them has a causeways crossing the moats lined with 54 gods (devas) on one side and 54 demons (asuras) on the other side bearing naga’s body, symbolizing the myth of the Churning of the Sea of Milk. The five gates of Angkor Thom are 1. South gate, locally known as Tonle Om gate, 2. East gate (or ghost gate), 3. North gate (or Dei Chhnang gate), 4. West gate (or Takao gate), 5. Victory gate., Location : Siem Reap., Source : Rooney, Dawn. Angkor: An Introduction. Hong Kong: Odyssey Guides, 2005., This item digitized and made available online with funds provided by United States Department of Education, TICFIA (Technological Innovation and Cooperation for Foreign Information) Grant P337A05006.
Angkor Thom, Gate of Victory naga balustrade
Angkor Thom, means big city, was the planned capital of Jayavarman VII, at the center of which was the state temple of Bayon. The walls of the city are 1.86 miles (3 kilometers) on each side, and enclose an area of 2225 acres (900 hectares), bordered by a 328 feet (100 meters) wide moat. The city has five main gates, and each of them has a causeways crossing the moats lined with 54 gods (devas) on one side and 54 demons (asuras) on the other side bearing naga’s body, symbolizing the myth of the Churning of the Sea of Milk. The five gates of Angkor Thom are 1. South gate, locally known as Tonle Om gate, 2. East gate (or ghost gate), 3. North gate (or Dei Chhnang gate), 4. West gate (or Takao gate), 5. Victory gate., Location : Siem Reap., Source : Rooney, Dawn. Angkor: An Introduction. Hong Kong: Odyssey Guides, 2005., This item digitized and made available online with funds provided by United States Department of Education, TICFIA (Technological Innovation and Cooperation for Foreign Information) Grant P337A05006.
Angkor Thom, Gate of Victory and causeway
Angkor Thom, means big city, was the planned capital of Jayavarman VII, at the center of which was the state temple of Bayon. The walls of the city are 1.86 miles (3 kilometers) on each side, and enclose an area of 2225 acres (900 hectares), bordered by a 328 feet (100 meters) wide moat. The city has five main gates, and each of them has a causeways crossing the moats lined with 54 gods (devas) on one side and 54 demons (asuras) on the other side bearing naga’s body, symbolizing the myth of the Churning of the Sea of Milk. The five gates of Angkor Thom are 1. South gate, locally known as Tonle Om gate, 2. East gate (or ghost gate), 3. North gate (or Dei Chhnang gate), 4. West gate (or Takao gate), 5. Victory gate., Location : Siem Reap., Source : Rooney, Dawn. Angkor: An Introduction. Hong Kong: Odyssey Guides, 2005., This item digitized and made available online with funds provided by United States Department of Education, TICFIA (Technological Innovation and Cooperation for Foreign Information) Grant P337A05006.
Angkor Wat, View of Moat from Northwest Outer Enclosure
Angkor Wat is the best known and largest of all the monuments from the Angkorian period (9th-14th centuries). Suryavarman II (1113-c.1150) built Angkor Wat in the first half of the twelfth century as his state temple. Based on the temple’s orientation towards the west, scholars agree that it was likely dedicated to Visnu. The temple complex is delimited by its surrounding moats (more than 3 miles or 4.82 kilometers in circumference), which places it among the world’s largest religious sites with an area of 494 acres (200 hectares). Aside from its monumental scale, Angkor Wat is renowned for its architectural complexity, and it features cruciform terraces, naga balustrades, and elaborately carved pediments and columns. The monument is symbolic of the cosmic temple mountain, or Mount Meru, and consists of a quincunx pyramid design with concentric galleries. These galleries contain approximately 600 meters (1970 feet) of narrative bas-reliefs illustrating scenes from the Ramayana and Mahabharata epics, and nearly 2000 depictions of Apsaras. After the movement of the capital to around Phnom Penh in the fifteenth century, the complex was transformed into a Buddhist worship place. Henri Mouhot "rediscovered" the site in 1860 and French archaeologists began excavation and restoration projects in 1901., Location : Siem Reap., Source : Rooney, Dawn. Angkor: An Introduction. Hong Kong: Odyssey Guides, 2005., This item digitized and made available online with funds provided by United States Department of Education, TICFIA (Technological Innovation and Cooperation for Foreign Information) Grant P337A05006.
Angkor Wat, View from Outermost Western Entrance
Angkor Wat is the best known and largest of all the monuments from the Angkorian period (9th-14th centuries). Suryavarman II (1113-c.1150) built Angkor Wat in the first half of the twelfth century as his state temple. Based on the temple’s orientation towards the west, scholars agree that it was likely dedicated to Visnu. The temple complex is delimited by its surrounding moats (more than 3 miles or 4.82 kilometers in circumference), which places it among the world’s largest religious sites with an area of 494 acres (200 hectares). Aside from its monumental scale, Angkor Wat is renowned for its architectural complexity, and it features cruciform terraces, naga balustrades, and elaborately carved pediments and columns. The monument is symbolic of the cosmic temple mountain, or Mount Meru, and consists of a quincunx pyramid design with concentric galleries. These galleries contain approximately 600 meters (1970 feet) of narrative bas-reliefs illustrating scenes from the Ramayana and Mahabharata epics, and nearly 2000 depictions of Apsaras. After the movement of the capital to around Phnom Penh in the fifteenth century, the complex was transformed into a Buddhist worship place. Henri Mouhot "rediscovered" the site in 1860 and French archaeologists began excavation and restoration projects in 1901., Location : Siem Reap., Source : Rooney, Dawn. Angkor: An Introduction. Hong Kong: Odyssey Guides, 2005., This item digitized and made available online with funds provided by United States Department of Education, TICFIA (Technological Innovation and Cooperation for Foreign Information) Grant P337A05006.
Angkor Wat, western causeway to outer enclosure
Angkor Wat is the best known and largest of all the monuments from the Angkorian period (9th-14th centuries). Suryavarman II (1113-c.1150) built Angkor Wat in the first half of the twelfth century as his state temple. Based on the temple’s orientation towards the west, scholars agree that it was likely dedicated to Visnu. The temple complex is delimited by its surrounding moats (more than 3 miles or 4.82 kilometers in circumference), which places it among the world’s largest religious sites with an area of 494 acres (200 hectares). Aside from its monumental scale, Angkor Wat is renowned for its architectural complexity, and it features cruciform terraces, naga balustrades, and elaborately carved pediments and columns. The monument is symbolic of the cosmic temple mountain, or Mount Meru, and consists of a quincunx pyramid design with concentric galleries. These galleries contain approximately 600 meters (1970 feet) of narrative bas-reliefs illustrating scenes from the Ramayana and Mahabharata epics, and nearly 2000 depictions of Apsaras. After the movement of the capital to around Phnom Penh in the fifteenth century, the complex was transformed into a Buddhist worship place. Henri Mouhot "rediscovered" the site in 1860 and French archaeologists began excavation and restoration projects in 1901., Location : Siem Reap., Source : Rooney, Dawn. Angkor: An Introduction. Hong Kong: Odyssey Guides, 2005., This item digitized and made available online with funds provided by United States Department of Education, TICFIA (Technological Innovation and Cooperation for Foreign Information) Grant P337A05006.
Angkor Wat, south steps of the western causeway
Angkor Wat is the best known and largest of all the monuments from the Angkorian period (9th-14th centuries). Suryavarman II (1113-c.1150) built Angkor Wat in the first half of the twelfth century as his state temple. Based on the temple’s orientation towards the west, scholars agree that it was likely dedicated to Visnu. The temple complex is delimited by its surrounding moats (more than 3 miles or 4.82 kilometers in circumference), which places it among the world’s largest religious sites with an area of 494 acres (200 hectares). Aside from its monumental scale, Angkor Wat is renowned for its architectural complexity, and it features cruciform terraces, naga balustrades, and elaborately carved pediments and columns. The monument is symbolic of the cosmic temple mountain, or Mount Meru, and consists of a quincunx pyramid design with concentric galleries. These galleries contain approximately 600 meters (1970 feet) of narrative bas-reliefs illustrating scenes from the Ramayana and Mahabharata epics, and nearly 2000 depictions of Apsaras. After the movement of the capital to around Phnom Penh in the fifteenth century, the complex was transformed into a Buddhist worship place. Henri Mouhot "rediscovered" the site in 1860 and French archaeologists began excavation and restoration projects in 1901., Location : Siem Reap., Source : Rooney, Dawn. Angkor: An Introduction. Hong Kong: Odyssey Guides, 2005., This item digitized and made available online with funds provided by United States Department of Education, TICFIA (Technological Innovation and Cooperation for Foreign Information) Grant P337A05006.
Angkor Wat, west entrance to outer enclosure
Angkor Wat is the best known and largest of all the monuments from the Angkorian period (9th-14th centuries). Suryavarman II (1113-c.1150) built Angkor Wat in the first half of the twelfth century as his state temple. Based on the temple’s orientation towards the west, scholars agree that it was likely dedicated to Visnu. The temple complex is delimited by its surrounding moats (more than 3 miles or 4.82 kilometers in circumference), which places it among the world’s largest religious sites with an area of 494 acres (200 hectares). Aside from its monumental scale, Angkor Wat is renowned for its architectural complexity, and it features cruciform terraces, naga balustrades, and elaborately carved pediments and columns. The monument is symbolic of the cosmic temple mountain, or Mount Meru, and consists of a quincunx pyramid design with concentric galleries. These galleries contain approximately 600 meters (1970 feet) of narrative bas-reliefs illustrating scenes from the Ramayana and Mahabharata epics, and nearly 2000 depictions of Apsaras. After the movement of the capital to around Phnom Penh in the fifteenth century, the complex was transformed into a Buddhist worship place. Henri Mouhot "rediscovered" the site in 1860 and French archaeologists began excavation and restoration projects in 1901., Location : Siem Reap., Source : Rooney, Dawn. Angkor: An Introduction. Hong Kong: Odyssey Guides, 2005., This item digitized and made available online with funds provided by United States Department of Education, TICFIA (Technological Innovation and Cooperation for Foreign Information) Grant P337A05006.
Angkor Wat, view of lintel and corbeled roof inside the central gopura of the outer enclosure
Angkor Wat is the best known and largest of all the monuments from the Angkorian period (9th-14th centuries). Suryavarman II (1113-c.1150) built Angkor Wat in the first half of the twelfth century as his state temple. Based on the temple’s orientation towards the west, scholars agree that it was likely dedicated to Visnu. The temple complex is delimited by its surrounding moats (more than 3 miles or 4.82 kilometers in circumference), which places it among the world’s largest religious sites with an area of 494 acres (200 hectares). Aside from its monumental scale, Angkor Wat is renowned for its architectural complexity, and it features cruciform terraces, naga balustrades, and elaborately carved pediments and columns. The monument is symbolic of the cosmic temple mountain, or Mount Meru, and consists of a quincunx pyramid design with concentric galleries. These galleries contain approximately 600 meters (1970 feet) of narrative bas-reliefs illustrating scenes from the Ramayana and Mahabharata epics, and nearly 2000 depictions of Apsaras. After the movement of the capital to around Phnom Penh in the fifteenth century, the complex was transformed into a Buddhist worship place. Henri Mouhot "rediscovered" the site in 1860 and French archaeologists began excavation and restoration projects in 1901., Location : Siem Reap., Source : Rooney, Dawn. Angkor: An Introduction. Hong Kong: Odyssey Guides, 2005., This item digitized and made available online with funds provided by United States Department of Education, TICFIA (Technological Innovation and Cooperation for Foreign Information) Grant P337A05006.
Angkor Wat, south view from central gopura of the outer enclosure
Angkor Wat is the best known and largest of all the monuments from the Angkorian period (9th-14th centuries). Suryavarman II (1113-c.1150) built Angkor Wat in the first half of the twelfth century as his state temple. Based on the temple’s orientation towards the west, scholars agree that it was likely dedicated to Visnu. The temple complex is delimited by its surrounding moats (more than 3 miles or 4.82 kilometers in circumference), which places it among the world’s largest religious sites with an area of 494 acres (200 hectares). Aside from its monumental scale, Angkor Wat is renowned for its architectural complexity, and it features cruciform terraces, naga balustrades, and elaborately carved pediments and columns. The monument is symbolic of the cosmic temple mountain, or Mount Meru, and consists of a quincunx pyramid design with concentric galleries. These galleries contain approximately 600 meters (1970 feet) of narrative bas-reliefs illustrating scenes from the Ramayana and Mahabharata epics, and nearly 2000 depictions of Apsaras. After the movement of the capital to around Phnom Penh in the fifteenth century, the complex was transformed into a Buddhist worship place. Henri Mouhot "rediscovered" the site in 1860 and French archaeologists began excavation and restoration projects in 1901., Location : Siem Reap., Source : Rooney, Dawn. Angkor: An Introduction. Hong Kong: Odyssey Guides, 2005., This item digitized and made available online with funds provided by United States Department of Education, TICFIA (Technological Innovation and Cooperation for Foreign Information) Grant P337A05006.